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If you’ve just bought a new phone but your SIM card doesn’t fit it, don’t worry we can organise for a swap to the correct size of SIM.   Already got a blank sim card ready to go? Please use Live Chat and one we will activate it for you.   Don’t have a blank sim card with you? You need to go to a T-Shop to get one and have the staff activate the sim for you on the spot. Alternatively, you can order the sim though Live Chat but keep in mind it will take 3 - 5 business days to arrive.   The new SIM, once activated, will replace your old one. This means everything on your account will stay the same, including your phone number and any credit balance you may still have.   This process also applies if you've lost your SIM card and require a replacement.
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Since launching our 4G network, we’ve had feedback from some customers in areas with low 4G reception that they’re experiencing slow data connections. Here are some answers to commonly asked questions.   I have low bars of 4G coverage, my 3G coverage was better. It is important to note that the actual bar representation does not indicate speed but rather network/signal strength and it varies between network types and manufacturers so is not the best indicator. It is much better to compare actual experience, ie. Is the service faster than before or do you find pages / apps take longer to connect?   If the latter you may want to lock the network to 3G for the best experience, otherwise ignore the bars and enjoy the faster speeds :)   When I make or receive a phone call the 4G disconnects and I get pushed back to 3G. Voice calls are made using the 3G network so this is nothing to worry about, it is a normal part of how the network operates.   My phone constantly switches between 3G, 4G and E indicators. This may indicate that the 4G signal at that particular location is not quite as strong as the 3G coverage. Your phone continually changes between the networks as the device tries to ensure that you have the best possible connection at all times. In situations such as this the frequent changes can interrupt connectivity. Customers who have difficulties with constantly switching networks are well advised to lock their device to 3G or 4G for optimal experience.   How do I lock my device to the 3G network? You’ll need to change some of your network settings on your phone. Here are some instructions for the most frequently used devices.   iPhones     Select ‘Settings’ Go to ‘General’ Ensure ‘Mobile Data’ is On Change ‘Voice & Date’ to 3G Note: on some older versions of iOS you may not have Voice & Data but rather an option 'Enable 4G' or similar that you can turn off on this same screen.   Samsung Galaxy series            Select ‘Apps’ Select ‘Settings’ Select the ‘Connections Tab’ then select ‘More networks’ Select ‘Mobile networks’ Select ‘Network Mode’ Ensure network mode is set to ‘WCDMA/GSM (auto connect)’. If you’re connecting to LTE/WCDMA/GSM, your phone will lock to 4G even if the 4G signal is poor. I’m still having trouble with network connectivity on the 3G network Please call our Customer Care centre on 125 8881 for technical support.
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How to identify if Games Have In-App Purchases   On Windows Phone, you should read the app description to see if it mentions an in-app purchase or take a look at the reviews by users. Regrettably, mention of In-App purchases on Windows Phone appears to be at the app developer’s discretion so ultimately you may need to install the app to be sure.   How To restrict In-App Purchases   Microsoft have a really great way to protect the kids from purchases via Kid’s Corner feature. This creates a separate access level on your phone to only the content that you want kids to access. Note that by default In-App purchases are disabled for this area entirely, however if you set a Wallet PIN you can approve individual purchases. Regardless of if you intend to use the Kid’s Corner feature to protect yourself it is a good idea to setup a Wallet PIN on your handset anyway. Go to the Wallet application and tap More > Settings + PIN > Wallet PIN. After setting up your PIN code, check the option that reads ‘Use Wallet PIN to protect music, app and in-app purchases’.
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How to identify if Games Have In-App Purchases   In the Google Play store you'll find “In-App Purchases” written towards the top of the app details screen but in this case it will appear underneath the install button. If you’d like to find out more about the in-app purchases, tap the description and scroll to the bottom. Android shows you a price range for In-App purchases but does not detail precisely what the items are, to find out you will need to actually install the app.       How To restrict In-App Purchases   On Android, it isn’t possible to turn off in-app purchases altogether. However, you can set up your phone so that a password is required before every purchase. To do this, open Google Play then go to Settings and scroll down to ‘Require authentication for purchases’. Tap on this and set it to require authentication ‘for all purchases through Google Play on this device’.  
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How to identify if Games Have In-App Purchases   On the app information page, there’ll be “Offers In-App Purchases” under the name of the app developer. If you see this, scroll right down to the bottom and tap on “In-App Purchases”. Here, you’ll be able to see the type of purchases available in the game and you can then decide if you want to give it a try.       How To restrict In-App Purchases   There are two settings to help protect you from unwanted purchase on iOS. The first thing you can do is set up your device to always require a password . You can do this through Settings > iTunes & App Store > Password Settings and selecting the ‘Always Require’ (pictured below left) For extra security, you can also turn off in-app purchases entirely at the system level. To do this, go to Settings > General > Restrictions and change the In-App Purchases option to be off (pictured below right).    
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What to check before buying a second hand phone Most of us know someone who has found a great bargain on a second hand phone, only to later discover they’ve bought a dud; something they’re unable to use.   It’s not a great experience.   So here’s a few things to make sure you check the next time you’re looking at purchasing a second hand phone.   Note: If you’re purchasing the device online you may not be able to check all of these, or you’ll have to rely on the word of the seller. If safe to do so I recommend buying the handset face to face, so that you can confirm the quality of your potential new handset!   Request that the phone comes fully charged: So you can test the handset you’ll want it to be charged. I’d also recommend bringing a compatible charger cord of your own, in the event that the handset is not charged. Test a compatible SIM card: Popping in your own SIM card will allow you to double check that the handset isn’t locked to a network you can’t use. Often only the named account holder will be able to unlock the phone. If the handset is locked you’ll want to make sure the seller gets it unlocked before you purchase it. This can normally be done via a short phone call to the appropriate service provider. Call the new phone: Use another phone to call the one you’re inspecting so you can check the mic and the speakers. Make sure that you switch to hands free to check the speaker. This will also help double check that your desired network is not blocked. Try adjusting the volume while on the call to test the buttons Test other buttons: Try some of the shortcut gestures (e.g. the double or triple click of the home button for iPhone) to make sure all buttons are responsive and in good condition. Also remember to try the lock/sleep button to check you can get back into the handset as needed. Check the camera: Take a photo with the front and rear cameras and have a look at them. Make sure the camera can focus as needed. A foggy camera may just need a clean, but if this doesn’t help the handset will likely need to be repaired. Inspect the charger port/dock: Make sure that the charging port, normally on the bottom of the phone isn’t chipped or crooked and that the charger cord you’ve hopefully brought along sits firmly in there. If you have to sit the phone a certain way to get it charging I’d seriously think twice before continuing with the purchase. It might not seem like a big deal, but it’s likely to only get worse. WiFi: If possible it’s not a bad idea to try connecting to a nearby WiFi network, just to confirm that device has no issues locating and connecting to other networks. Try the touchscreen: Have a flick around the phones home screen and try entering and exiting a couple of apps, just to make sure the phone is going to respond to your commands appropriately. Confirm the network bands: Depending on where the handset was purchased, and from which provider originally, it may only work on certain network bands. Confirm the model number, and do a quick bit of google searching to confirm which network bands it will work on. For compatibility with the Telstra network, you’ll need to make sure that the handset can operate on the 850 MHz or 2100 MHz bands for 3G and the 1800 MHz band for 4G. Telstra also supports 2G on 900 MHz, but this is currently being decommissioned. Those are the big ones, but of course if there are specific features you’re buying the handset for, make sure you give them a try too.
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From time to time you’re going to need either your SIM Pin or PUK code. As its not needed often, a lot of people don’t keep a record of it. If this is you, here’s what you need to do to retrieve it.   Things to Remember By default, your SIM Pin is the last 4 digits of your PUK code. If you’ve changed it yourself, this will no longer apply Entering your SIM Pin incorrectly 3 times will cause your phone to then ask for the PUK code When you enter your PUK code correctly, you’ll be asked to choose a SIM Pin (this can be the same as the last one but if you’re doing this you’ve probably forgotten what that is). It’s written on your SIM packaging When you bought your SIM card it would have been attached to a larger piece of plastic which you popped it out of. On this card you’ll find your PUK cod printed and as above, the last 4 digits of this will be your SIM Pin if you haven’t changed it.   Retrieve it online If you’ve thrown away the packaging that came with your phone, don’t stress. You can retrieve your PUK code online. All you’ll need to do now is enter your full name, mobile number and date of birth as it shows on your account. Enter those details here and you’ll be provided with your PUK code. If for whatever reason that doesn’t work chat to us.   Speak to one of our reps You’ve always got the option to go old school and chat to us here. Our trained reps will be able give you all of the information you need.
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Usually, replying to the SMS with STOP is all that's required. This may incur a charge. However, we recommend checking directly with your service provider. If you are unable to reply to the SMS you've received, visit 19SMS to view the sender's contact details.   To block premium SMS, Boost customers can request this via our Live Chat
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  Have you been running down your data credit faster than you used to? Regularly running out of credit before pay day?   Never fear. Perform the Data Heath Check below to work out how you can fix your data woes.   Get Connected   Do you regularly find yourself watching videos, downloading photos or streaming music on the go? It might be using up more data than you realise. We recommend doing data-intensive tasks while you’re connected to Wi-Fi. Try downloading your new favourite song or podcast before you leave the house. You could even make downloading content on Wi-Fi part of your morning routine. Check your settings   Sometimes the settings on your phone will use data in the background without your knowledge. Try turning mobile data off when you’re using Wi-Fi, or on the apps that you only use at home. You can also change your settings to limit background updates that use data. Turn off background refresh and automatic updates, and turn off mobile data on data-intensive apps like YouTube. You can also turn off settings on individual apps, like the auto-play video feature on Facebook and Instagram, or fetching email. Have a poke around in your phone and app settings and see how many mobile data updates you can switch off. This is not the place   If you’re trying to lower your data use, think about which data-intensive websites and apps you’re using. Always keep in mind that some sites use more data than others. Avoid sites like YouTube, Spotify and web based games when you need to conserve your data. Take advantage   Make sure you’re aware of offers of bonus data you may be eligible for, what calls cost the most and when peak rates apply. You could also take advantage of free Wi-Fi – there are lots of hotspots around if you know where to look.  Turn it off   You can turn data off on most devices. If you only make calls and send texts, or you are nearing the end of your credit but you don’t want to recharge, simply turn data off for a while.   If you do all of these things and you still find that you’re having trouble with your data, you might want to consider changing plans. Check out our rates and plans
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If your handset is locked to a particular carrier (other than Telstra) you will need to contact that carrier directly.  Depending on how long you have had the handset you may need to pay a fee to have the phone unlocked.   For Telstra Apple iPhone customers other than Iphone 5c, 5s, 6 and 6+ wanting to use a Boost Mobile Pre-paid SIM in your phone, you will need to unlock your phone from the Telstra network. Apple iPhones purchased from a Telstra Pre-paid offer are subject to a $150 unlocking fee. iPhones purchased from Telstra on a Post-paid plan can be unlocked free of charge. please refer to this http://community.boost.com.au/t5/Setup-Device-Support/Using-a-Telstra-locked-iPhone-with-Boost/ta-p/5653
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Symptoms #111# Screen Time-out Diagnosis When using the #111# service, after 40 seconds of inactivity, the screen will time out and your session will expire. Solution Please ensure that when using the #111# service that you respond promptly to ensure you do not get timed out.   You are given 40 seconds at most to respond, the timer starts the moment that the message pops.
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Heading overseas with Boost mobile?   Here is a few tips to help you while "roaming".   Firstly, you need to make sure you know the rates, and have some Boost "Add on" credit applied to your account. Roaming call rates can be found here (greyed out countries means the International Roaming is unavailable for prepaid) International Roaming Prepaid for Telstra   You will notice that making AND receiving calls plus using data is VERY expensive. Even retrieving traditional MessageBank voicemails while roaming is expensive. So instead, I choose to rely on SMS while roaming as the rates are much better (SMS in most countries is 65c to send, and free to receive).   To do that, I disable all incoming calls. And force those caller messages to come to me via SMS (free to receive). This is how I do it.   On your phone, firstly you want to make sure "data roaming" is disabled. In Android, this is in Setting > More Settings > Mobile Network > Data Roaming (make sure it is unticked). I leave it always unticked, as I never want to use data while roaming.   Next, stop incoming calls coming to your phone (which you will pay for otherwise, if answered). You should have a menu option for Call Settings. You want to find the Call Forwading options.   Normally (say if you have Messagebank/voicemail running) it will be as per below: Always forward = Disabled Forward when busy = Forward to +61101 Forward when unanswered = Forward to +61101 Forward when anreachable = Forward to +61101   When roaming overseas, I simply modify the first option to: Always forward = +61 418 707 111 This setting will grey out all the other options below it. * You can dial a number to enable that setting quickly. Dial **21*+61418707111*10#.   Your callers will now be directed to the free Message2Txt service instantly without ringing on your phone (they leave a 10 second voicemail message, which is translated into a SMS and sent to you). The translation sometimes isn't very accurate, but it does pass along the callers phone number also, so you know who it was that called.   While this setting is enabled, SMS will still send/receive as normal, but no calls will come into your phone. You can make calls still though if needed (very expensive, but it is an option if you need it). If I need to call someone back, I normally use hotel/cafe WIFI, and use Skype or VoIP services to call.   When you get back from overseas, you just need to go back into that call setting menu and change the "Always forward" back to "disabled". Your normal voicemail options will go straight back to how you had it before. * If you want to dial a number to disable the setting quickly, dial ##21**10#.   It is smart to have a quick play with this while you are still in Australia, just so you work out how it all works, and what the caller will hear (try calling your number to hear the setting, and leave a message etc). I normally run this setting while at the airport about to board the plan (killing some time), and then change it back to normal when I arrive back home (waiting for luggage/taxi).
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For managing MessageBank/voicemail diversion settings via the handset directly.     To enable voicemail ring:   *61*101**30# Extend the ringtime before diverting to 101 (MessageBank) when unanswered after 30 seconds - The "30" can be changed for "5" or "15" seconds if needed.   *62*101# Divert to 101 when unreachable.   *67*101# Divert to 101 when busy.   To disable voicemail ring:   #61# Cancel divert when unanswered.   #62# Cancel divert when unreachable.   #67# Cancel divert when busy.   #002# Cancel MessageBank, and enable Message2Txt.     If you wish to cancel both MessageBank AND the Message2Txt service simulteonsly (calls will ring all the way out), contact the Boost customer care team to ask them to apply the setting to your account.   How to restore or remove original settings   To restore all three conditional call forwarding settings (Busy, No Answer, No Reply) to MessageBank®, enter **004*101 #. To remove all three conditional call forwarding settings (Busy, No Answer, No Reply) to MessageBank®, enter ##004 #. Both of these actions will set the default ring time of 15 seconds.
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Coverage Problems? Things you need to know   The following are some factors that cause interference: Physical objects: Trees, masonry, buildings, and other physical structures are some of the most common sources of interference. The density of the materials used in a building’s construction determines the number of walls the RF signal can pass through and still maintain adequate coverage. Concrete and steel walls are particularly difficult for a signal to pass through. These structures will weaken or at times completely prevent wireless signals. Radio frequency interference: Wireless technologies such as 802.11b/g use an RF range of 2.4GHz, and so do many other devices, such as cordless phones, microwaves, and so on. Devices that share the channel can cause noise and weaken the signals. Electrical interference: Electrical interference comes from devices such as computers, refrigerators, fans, lighting fixtures, or any other motorized devices. The impact that electrical interference has on the signal depends on the proximity of the electrical device to the wireless access point. Advances in wireless technologies and in electrical devices have reduced the impact that these types of devices have on wireless transmissions. Environmental factors: Weather conditions can have a huge impact on wireless signal integrity. Lightning, for example, can cause electrical interference, and fog can weaken signals as they pass through.   TELSTRA COVERAGE DISCLAIMER   All mobile devices have been tested to operate within the coverage contours of the displayed coverage maps. Mobile device coverage depends on where you are, the device you are using and whether it has an external antenna attached. Customers should be aware that the Telstra mobile coverage maps displayed have been created using tools that predict the likely areas of coverage. Not every particular location within the identified coverage areas has been individually tested for coverage. This means that while the footprint of coverage outlined on the maps is generally accurate, there will be specific areas described as being within a coverage area where a customer's device will not work. This is a common characteristic of wireless systems. For example, coverage could be degraded or not existent in specific locations due to certain physical structures or geographic features or as a result of the device used. Physical structures which may block or inhibit coverage could include basements, lifts, underground car parks, concrete buildings, tunnels and road cuttings. Geographic features which may block or inhibit coverage could include formations such as hills and mountains or even trees. Customers should also be aware the Telstra mobile coverage maps also may indicate planned coverage expansions of the Telstra mobile network. Coverage planned for the future is based on Telstra's rollout schedule. Telstra reserves the right to modify this schedule without notice, as required from time to time. Data speeds experienced on Telstra's mobile networks may be affected by network availability, the type and configuration of customer equipment, the performance of external networks (for example the Internet), the signal strength of the device used and other factors such as the type of application. The offshore coverage shown is only indicative of where a Next G® device may operate. Factors beyond Telstra's control such as the weather, tides, sea conditions and the customer's installation (type and height of antenna above sea level) can significantly influence the actual user experience of coverage, data speed and performance. Public mobile networks must not be relied upon as a primary method of emergency communication at sea.   OUT TO SEA COVERAGE Telstra's 850MHz Next G network can typically extend 20 to 70 km out to sea from mobile base stations located near the coast. However, there are many factors like the weather, tides, sea conditions and your antenna installation (type and height above sea level) can significantly influence coverage, data speed and performance. As a result, you must not rely on the Telstra Mobile Network as a primary method of communication at sea. To assist your mobile services when out to sea, you should use a directly connected external antenna – one that is omni-directional or a specialist marine antenna capable of 'tracking' to the best serving base station. The antenna should be mounted as high as possible on your vessel using marine grade cabling and connections. In order for a service out to sea to work effectively, line of sight to the terrestrial base station is required. This is influenced by the height of the serving base station, land based obstructions such as trees and buildings, as well as the general topography of the land, which can block signals. Coverage will not be reliable over the horizon from a mobile base station even though it may be usable at times.
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Sick of running across the room to answer your phone only to get there one ring too late? Well then check out this helpful tip to give you more time before you miss a call.   If you dial this simple code into your phone you can choose how long it rings for before it diverts to messagebank or hangs up. You just need to go into your phone dialler (as if you were going to make a call) and enter **61*101**(Number of seconds)#. So, let’s say you want your phone to ring for 30 seconds then you’d enter **61*101**30# and press send/call. It’s that easy!   Here are a few things you should remember: The default ring time is 15 seconds You must select ring times in 5 second increments (15, 20, 25 etc) 30 seconds is the maximum you can select If you want to reset everything back to the default then enter ##004# and press send/call If you have any troubles at all make sure you give us a call on 1258881 or chat to us.
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Everyone wants to last the distance…. So we thought we’d give you some helpful hints on how to save data, just in case you’re one of those data hungry folk, finding it hard to make those GB’s last the 30 days.  1. When you’re not using your mobile data, turn it off!  - This hint has been proven to work 30% of the time, every time!     2. Be aware when watching movies on your phone J - We know it’s ridiculously awesome that you can now watch full length movies on your handset, but it really doesn’t help your data usage at all! Try keep video consumption to a minimum if you can. Pretty please.   3. Why not Wi Fi! – McDonalds, your school and even your local cafe offer FREE Wi Fi. So why not take advantage of it and stop chewing through your own hard earned data.   4. GPS actually stands for Wastes All Data – Although it’s cool letting all your friends know where you are 24/7, GPS actually goes through a heap of data. Why not embrace the ninja and go stealth.   I’ve also listed tips specifically for iOS7 and Android that you should check out.     If you have any other helpful hints be sure to let us know    
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We're often asked questions around tethering your mobile handset whilst using a Boost Mobile service so I thought I'd share some kep points with you.   Tething or Hotspotting is when you use your mobile phone to supply an internet source to another device either over Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or cable. This is a feature of most new smartphones and isn't controlled by Boost Mobile.   When using this feature, any internet usage used by the device you have conntected to your mobile handset will be deducted from your current inclunsions (etiher from your latest UNLTD® recharge or Add On credit).   There is no additional cost for this feature.    If you're having difficulties using this service, please ensure that you do have adequate data usage as well as trying these simple trouble shooting steps. If that still doesn't work, please call Boost Mobile on 1258881 or use their live chat service.
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There’s often questions asked in the community around Boost and Telstra including what the difference is, are they the same, does Telstra own Boost and so on. This should clarify it for everyone.   Firstly, Telstra does not own Boost. Boost owns Boost. Telstra and Boost have an agreement wherein Boost re-sell their NextG (3G network) whilst utilising some of Telstra’s back end systems. This in no way means Telstra owns Boost.   Telstra as a company offer a suite of products and services across multiple platforms where as Boost focuses on bring value to its customers in the pre-paid mobile market. Whilst Telstra offers mobile services on both its Next G and 4G networks, Boost only provides services on Telstra Next G (3G) network.   As the Boost uses Telstra Next G network, in some circumstances a Boost SIM will work in a handset locked to the Telstra network however if you’re ever unsure it’s best to check by calling Boost on 1258881. This doesn’t mean you can use a Telstra SIM to activate a Boost service or use a Telstra recharge voucher on a Boost service. 
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Losing your phone these days can be pretty devastating with the amount of information we keep in them let alone having to worry about someone else having the ability to pose as you to your friends and family.   Different phones have different security options available to you so I’d strongly recommend you look into these whilst setting your phone up (no point checking them out when you no longer have your phone). The 2 big, preinstalled options are “Find my iPhone” and “Android Device Manager”.   You’ll also need to get a new SIM card to replace the one you’ve lost. This will serve 2 purposes. Firstly, it’ll disable the original SIM preventing it from being used by anyone else and secondly, it’ll transfer your account across so you can use the same number and any remaining credit you have. To order a new SIM, you’ll need to give Boost support a call on 1258881 or use their live chat service.   At the point of contacting boost, if you are concerned about someone else using your service, you may also like to request Call Barring. If you do this, remember you’ll need to have it de-activated when you get your new SIM.
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Saving your credit card details can be a real time saver and make life easier if you’re regularly recharging someone else’s service (e.g. your child’s service). Doing this is quick, easy and can be done during your next recharge.   On your Boost device, dial #111# or go to care.boost.com.au Select Credit/Debit card recharge in the recharge menu Enter your payment details along with the amount you want to recharge Once you have submitted your details you’ll be asked if you want to save your credit card details. Select yes (option 1)
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